Home Sweet Home: Summer Sun Safety – Longview News


Posted: Saturday, July 21, 2012 4:00 am
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Updated: 4:39 pm, Tue Jul 17, 2012.


Home Sweet Home: Summer Sun Safety

Angie W. Monk Wood County Extension Agent

Longview News-Journal

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July is UV Safety Awareness Month.  While folks are enjoying the great outdoors during the summer is the perfect time for reminders about reducing the risks for skin cancer.  Protecting yourself from harmful UV exposure and keeping an eye open to detect problems early are two of the ways to do this.

When you’re having fun outdoors, it’s easy to forget how important it is to protect yourself from the sun.  Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays in as little as 15 minutes.  But it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure.  And UV rays from tanning beds and sunlamps are just as dangerous as the UV rays from the sun.

So it isn’t surprising that rates of skin cancer are on the rise.  Millions of Americans are treated for skin cancer every year.

The good news is that you can protect yourself from skin cancer.  Avoiding too much UV light can help prevent skin cancer and doing skin self-exams can help catch problems early.

Cover Up Before heading Out

Whether it’s hot and sunny or cool and cloudy, you should always take steps to protect yourself when you’re outdoors.  Follow these safety tips:

• Always use sunscreen.  Those that offer a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 and protect against both UVA and UVB rays are best.

• Wear clothing that protects you from the sun’s rays, like long-sleeved shirts and long pants or specially made UV-protective clothing.

• Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears and neck.

• Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays as possible

July is UV Safety Awareness Month.  While folks are enjoying the great outdoors during the summer is the perfect time for reminders about reducing the risks for skin cancer.  Protecting yourself from harmful UV exposure and keeping an eye open to detect problems early are two of the ways to do this.

When you’re having fun outdoors, it’s easy to forget how important it is to protect yourself from the sun.  Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays in as little as 15 minutes.  But it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure.  And UV rays from tanning beds and sunlamps are just as dangerous as the UV rays from the sun.

So it isn’t surprising that rates of skin cancer are on the rise.  Millions of Americans are treated for skin cancer every year.

The good news is that you can protect yourself from skin cancer.  Avoiding too much UV light can help prevent skin cancer and doing skin self-exams can help catch problems early.

Cover Up Before heading Out

Whether it’s hot and sunny or cool and cloudy, you should always take steps to protect yourself when you’re outdoors.  Follow these safety tips:

• Always use sunscreen.  Those that offer a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 and protect against both UVA and UVB rays are best.

• Wear clothing that protects you from the sun’s rays, like long-sleeved shirts and long pants or specially made UV-protective clothing.

• Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade the face, head, ears and neck.

• Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.

on

Saturday, July 21, 2012 4:00 am.

Updated: 4:39 pm.

More Safety Info:

  1. Summer Home Safety
  2. Public meets variety of city, county workers at Sweet Home Safety Fair
  3. Home alone? AVFD provides safety tips for summer latchkey kids
  4. St. Francis Promotes Home Safety In "Weekend Warrior" Program
  5. Home safety checks planned for Georgetown and Ridge Farm – Champaign/Urbana News

 

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